The Consequences of Improper Scheduling

For healthcare organizations, the benefits of proper physician and staff scheduling are frequently highlighted. What people fail to discuss in-depth are the problems organizations face when they build schedules incorrectly. Despite the existence of automated scheduling applications specifically designed for healthcare organizations, many organizations continue to take great risks by using outdated scheduling methods. Below are just a few issues that can arise and cause major problems within an organization if physicians and staff aren’t properly scheduled.

Staff Issues

Poorly crafted schedules have errors. As a physician or staff member, these errors make it hard to effectively to meet job requirements. The confusion from the scheduling errors causes issues at every level of your organization; what’s more, staff members are likely to get frustrated. This frustration can create dissatisfaction amongst employees. If the scheduling issues aren’t resolved, then organizations may even see issues with employee retention.

Business Issues

Using outdated scheduling methods likely means that users are wasting unnecessary time building the schedule and even more time to manually check for errors. We know that manual error checking is not foolproof. Errors that aren’t caught are sent out to the staff, causing the aforementioned issues. Moreover, scheduling managers need to reopen the published schedule, make alterations and attempt to ensure everyone is working off of the correct schedule. This unnecessary work requires even more time and money and inhibits managers from handling other tasks essential to the workplace.

With an automated healthcare scheduling application, organizations have the ability to avoid unnecessary mistakes that are common with outdated scheduling methods. In addition to avoiding problems, organizations have the opportunity to save time and money while also improving staff satisfaction and retention. To learn more about automated scheduling, check out “Ending Healthcare’s Scheduling Nightmare.”